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[image]Io in Eclipse 2 - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
This image of Io eclipsed by Jupiter's shadow is a combination of several images taken by the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) between 09:35 and 09:41 Universal Time on February 27, 2007, about 28 hours after the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. North is at the top of the image. In the darkness, only glowing hot lava, auroral displays in Io's tenuous atmosphere and the moon's volcanic plumes are visible...
Keywords: What -- Io; What -- New Horizons; What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- Jupiter
Downloads: 6
[image]LORRI Takes an Even Closer Look at the Little Red Spot - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
LORRI took this mosaic 9 hours -- or not quite one Jupiter rotation period -- after snapping its previous images of the Little Red Spot on Feb 26, 2007 (see PIA09294), at a longer range of 3.5 million kilometers (2.2 million miles) and at a lower resolution of 17 kilometers (10.5 miles) per pixel. The new mosaic was obtained with the Little Red Spot closer to the center of the visible disk of Jupiter, so there is less foreshortening and better illumination...
Keywords: What -- LORRI; What -- Jupiter; What -- New Horizons; What -- Earth
Downloads: 7
[image]Moons around Jupiter - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
The New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) took this photo of Jupiter at 20:42:01 UTC on January 9, 2007, when the spacecraft was 80 million kilometers (49.6 million miles) from the giant planet. The volcanic moon Io is to the left of the planet; the shadow of the icy moon Ganymede moves across Jupiter's northern hemisphere. Ganymede's average orbit distance from Jupiter is about 1 million kilometers (620,000 miles); Io's is 422,000 kilometers (262,000 miles)...
Keywords: What -- New Horizons; What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- Jupiter; What -- Moon; What -- Io; What -- Ganymede; What -- Mercury
Downloads: 16
[image]Tvashtar Movie - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
Tvashtar Movie Using its Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), the New Horizons spacecraft captured the two frames in this "movie" of the 330-kilometer (200-mile) high Tvashtar volcanic eruption plume on Jupiter's moon Io on February 28, 2007, from a range of 2.7 million kilometers (1.7 million miles). The two images were taken 50 minutes apart, at 03:50 and 04:40 Universal Time, and because particles in the plume take an estimated 30 minutes to fall back to the surface after being ejected b...
Keywords: What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- New Horizons; What -- Moon; What -- Io; What -- Jupiter
Downloads: 7
[image]Jupiter's Rings: Sharpest View - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
The New Horizons spacecraft took the best images of Jupiter's charcoal-black rings as it approached and then looked back at Jupiter. The top image was taken on approach, showing three well-defined lanes of gravel- to boulder-sized material composing the bulk of the rings, as well as lesser amounts of material between the rings. New Horizons snapped the lower image after it had passed Jupiter on February 28, 2007, and looked back in a direction toward the sun...
Keywords: What -- New Horizons; What -- Jupiter; What -- Sun
Downloads: 10
[image]Ammonia Ice Clouds on Jupiter - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
The top cloud layer on Jupiter is thought to consist of ammonia ice, but most of that ammonia "hides" from spectrometers. It does not absorb light in the same way ammonia does. To many scientists, this implies that ammonia churned up from lower layers of the atmosphere "ages" in some way after it condenses, possibly by being covered with a photochemically generated hydrocarbon mixture. The New Horizons Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA), the half of the Ralph instrument that is able to...
Keywords: What -- Jupiter; What -- New Horizons; What -- LEISA; What -- Earth
Downloads: 5
[image]A 'Moving' Jupiter Global Map (Animation) - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
The Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on New Horizons has acquired six global maps of Jupiter as the spacecraft approaches the giant planet for a close encounter at the end of February. The high-resolution camera acquired each of six observation "sets" as a series of individual pictures taken one hour apart, covering a full 10-hour rotation of Jupiter. The LORRI team at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) reduced the sets to form six individual maps in a simple r...
Keywords: What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- New Horizons; What -- Jupiter; What -- Mercury; What -- Sun; What -- Earth; What -- Polar; What -- Io; What -- Ganymede
Downloads: 30
[image]Massive Gas Cloud Around Jupiter - NASA/JPL/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory
An innovative instrument on NASA's Cassini spacecraft makes the space environment around Jupiter visible, revealing a donut-shaped gas cloud encircling the planet. The image was taken with the energetic neutral atom imaging technique by the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument on Cassini as the spacecraft flew past Jupiter in early 2001 at a distance of about 10 million kilometers (6 million miles). This technique provides information about a source by detecting neutral atoms emitted by the source,...
Keywords: What -- Cassini; What -- Jupiter; What -- Magnetospheric IMaging Instrument (MIMI); What -- Moon; What -- Europa; Where -- Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL); Where -- California; Where -- Washington
Downloads: 5
[image]New Horizons Tracks an Asteroid - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
The two "spots" in this image are a composite of two images of asteroid 2002 JF56 taken on June 11 and June 12, 2006, with the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) component of the New Horizons Ralph imager. In the bottom image, taken when the asteroid was about 3.36 million kilometers (2.1 million miles) away from the spacecraft, 2002 JF56 appears like a dim star. At top, taken at a distance of about 1.34 million kilometers (833,000 miles), the object is more than a factor of six brighte...
Keywords: What -- Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera; What -- MVIC; What -- New Horizons; What -- Imager; What -- Sun; What -- Earth
Downloads: 6
[image]The Little Red Spot: Closest View Yet - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
This is a mosaic of three New Horizons images of Jupiter's Little Red Spot, taken with the spacecraft's Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) camera at 17:41 Universal Time on February 26 from a range of 3.5 million kilometers (2.1 million miles). The image scale is 17 kilometers (11 miles) per pixel, and the area covered measures 33,000 kilometers (20,000 miles) from top to bottom, two and one-half times the diameter of Earth...
Keywords: What -- New Horizons; What -- Horizons 1; What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- Earth; What -- Jupiter; What -- Sun; What -- Pluto
Downloads: 5
[image]New Horizons Sees Pluto (Animation) - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
The Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on New Horizons acquired images of the Pluto field three days apart in late September 2006, in order to see Pluto's motion against a dense background of stars. LORRI took three frames at 1-second exposures on both Sept. 21 and Sept. 24. Because it moved along its predicted path, Pluto was detected in all six images. These images are displayed using false-color to represent different intensities: the lowest intensity level is black, different shades of...
Keywords: What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- New Horizons; What -- Pluto
Downloads: 11
[image]Tvashtar's Plume - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
This dramatic image of Io was taken by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on New Horizons at 11:04 Universal Time on February 28, 2007, just about 5 hours after the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. The distance to Io was 2.5 million kilometers (1.5 million miles) and the image is centered at 85 degrees west longitude. At this distance, one LORRI pixel subtends 12 kilometers (7.4 miles) on Io...
Keywords: What -- Io; What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- New Horizons; What -- Jupiter; What -- Hubble Space Telescope (HST); What -- Sun; What -- Voyager; What -- Earth; What -- Pluto
Downloads: 6
[image]Io in Eclipse - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
This unusual image shows Io glowing in the darkness of Jupiter's shadow. It is a combination of eight images taken by the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) between 14:25 and 14:55 Universal Time on February 27, 2007, about 15 hours before the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. North is at the top of the image. Io's surface is invisible in the darkness, but the image reveals glowing hot lava, auroral displays in Io's tenuous atmosphere and volcanic plumes across the moo...
Keywords: What -- Io; What -- New Horizons; What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- Jupiter; What -- Moon
Downloads: 8
[image]The Colors of the Night - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
The New Horizons Multicolor Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) took this image of Jupiter's volcanic moon Io at 04:30 Universal Time on February 28, 2007, about one hour before New Horizons' closest approach to Jupiter, from a range of 2.7 million kilometers (1.7 million miles). Part of the Ralph imaging instrument, MVIC is designed for the very faint solar illumination at Pluto, and is too sensitive to image the brightly lit daysides of Jupiter's moons...
Keywords: What -- New Horizons; What -- MVIC; What -- Moon; What -- Io; What -- Jupiter; What -- Pluto; What -- Europa; What -- Polar; What -- Sun
Downloads: 5
[image]Ganymede in Visible and Infrared Light - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
This montage compares New Horizons' best views of Ganymede, Jupiter's largest moon, gathered with the spacecraft's Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) and its infrared spectrometer, the Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA). LEISA observes its targets in more than 200 separate wavelengths of infrared light, allowing detailed analysis of their surface composition. The LEISA image shown here combines just three of these wavelengths -- 1.3, 1.8 and 2.0 micrometers -- to highlight differ...
Keywords: What -- New Horizons; What -- Ganymede; What -- Moon; What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- Infrared Spectrometer; What -- Spectrometer; What -- LEISA
Downloads: 5
[image]Probing Storm Activity on Jupiter - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
Scientists assume Jupiter's clouds are composed primarily of ammonia, but only about 1% of the cloud area displays the characteristic spectral fingerprint of ammonia. This composite of infrared images taken by the New Horizons Linear Etalon Infrared Spectral Imager (LEISA) captures several eruptions of this relatively rare breed of ammonia cloud and follows the evolution of the clouds over two Jovian days...
Keywords: What -- New Horizons; What -- Linear Etalon Infrared Spectral Imager Array (LEISA); What -- Imager; What -- LEISA; What -- Jupiter; What -- Galileo; What -- TRACE
Downloads: 4
[image]Tvashtar Composite - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
Variations in the appearance of the giant plume from the Tvashtar volcano on Jupiter's moon Io are seen in this composite of the best photos taken by the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) during its Jupiter flyby in late February-early March 2007. New Horizons was fortunate to witness this unusually large plume during its brief Jupiter flyby; the Galileo Jupiter orbiter spent more than five years imaging the volcanic moon (between 1996 and 2001) without ever capturing such de...
Keywords: What -- Moon; What -- Io; What -- New Horizons; What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- Jupiter; What -- Galileo
Downloads: 4
[image]Ganymede - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
This is New Horizons' best image of Ganymede, Jupiter's largest moon, taken with the spacecraft's Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) camera at 10:01 Universal Time on February 27 from a range of 3.5 million kilometers (2.2 million miles). The longitude of the disk center is 38 degrees West and the image scale is 17 kilometers (11 miles) per pixel. Dark patches of ancient terrain are broken up by swaths of brighter, younger material, and the entire icy surface is peppered by more recent imp...
Keywords: What -- New Horizons; What -- Ganymede; What -- Moon; What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- Jupiter; What -- Earth
Downloads: 10
[image]Alice Views Jupiter and Io - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
This graphic illustrates the pointing and shows the data from one of many observations made by the New Horizons Alice ultraviolet spectrometer (UVS) instrument during the Pluto-bound spacecraft's recent encounter with Jupiter. The red lines in the graphic show the scale, orientation, and position of the combined "box and slot" field of view of the Alice UVS during this observation. The positions of Jupiter's volcanic moon, Io, the torus of ionized gas from Io, and Jupiter are shown relative to t...
Keywords: What -- New Horizons; What -- Alice Ultraviolet Spectrometer; What -- Spectrometer; What -- UVS; What -- Pluto; What -- Jupiter; What -- Moon; What -- Io
Downloads: 5
[image]Storm Spectra - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
These images, taken with the LEISA infrared camera on the New Horizons Ralph instrument, show fine details in Jupiter's turbulent atmosphere using light that can only be seen using infrared sensors. These are "false color" pictures made by assigning infrared wavelengths to the colors red, green and blue. LEISA (Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array) takes images across 250 IR wavelengths in the range from 1.25 to 2.5 microns, allowing scientists to obtain an infrared spectrum at every location on...
Keywords: What -- LEISA; What -- New Horizons; What -- Jupiter; What -- Polar
Downloads: 7
[image]Folds on Europa - NASA/JPL/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Brown University
This image, acquired by NASA's Galileo spacecraft on September 26, 1998, shows features on the surface of Jupiter's moon Europa that a scientific report published today interprets as signs of compressive folding. The imaged area is in the Astypalaea Linea region of Europa's southern hemisphere, seen with low-angle sunshine coming from the upper right. North is toward the top. Astypalaea Linea is the smooth, gray area that stretches from north to south across the image mosaic...
Keywords: What -- Galileo; What -- Moon; What -- Europa; Where -- Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL); Where -- Washington; Where -- California
Downloads: 7
[image]An Eruption on Io - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
The first images returned to Earth by New Horizons during its close encounter with Jupiter feature the Galilean moon Io, snapped with the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) at 0840 UTC on February 26, while the moon was 2.5 million miles (4 million kilometers) from the spacecraft. Io is intensely heated by its tidal interaction with Jupiter and is thus extremely volcanically active. That activity is evident in these images, which reveal an enormous dust plume, more than 150 miles high, eru...
Keywords: What -- Earth; What -- New Horizons; What -- Jupiter; What -- Moon; What -- Io; What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- Sun; What -- Galileo; What -- Cassini; What -- Hubble Space Telescope (HST); Where -- Texas; Where -- Hawaii
Downloads: 5
[image]A Day on Jupiter (Animation) - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
This "movie" strings 11 images of Jupiter captured by the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on January 9, 2007, when the spacecraft was about 80 million kilometers (49.6 million miles) from the giant planet. The sequence covers a full 10-hour rotation of Jupiter, during which the moons Ganymede and Io -- as well as the shadows they cast on Jupiter -- move across the camera's field of view.
Keywords: What -- Jupiter; What -- New Horizons; What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- Ganymede; What -- Io
Downloads: 6
[image]Ganymede's Shadow - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
The New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) took this photo of Jupiter at 20:42:01 UTC on January 9, 2007, when the spacecraft was 80 million kilometers (49.6 million miles) from the giant planet. The volcanic moon Io is to the left of the planet; the shadow of the icy moon Ganymede moves across Jupiter's northern hemisphere. Ganymede's average orbit distance from Jupiter is about 1 million kilometers (620,000 miles); Io's is 422,000 kilometers (262,000 miles)...
Keywords: What -- New Horizons; What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- Jupiter; What -- Moon; What -- Io; What -- Ganymede; What -- Mercury
Downloads: 13
[image]Jupiter's Moons: Family Portrait - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
This montage shows the best views of Jupiter's four large and diverse "Galilean" satellites as seen by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on the New Horizons spacecraft during its flyby of Jupiter in late February 2007. The four moons are, from left to right: Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. The images have been scaled to represent the true relative sizes of the four moons and are arranged in their order from Jupiter...
Keywords: What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- New Horizons; What -- Jupiter; What -- Io; What -- Europa; What -- Ganymede; What -- Callisto; What -- Moon; What -- Pluto; What -- Charon
Downloads: 8
[image]New Horizons Sees Pluto (Sept. 24) - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
A white arrow marks Pluto in this New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) picture taken Sept. 21, 2006. Seen at a distance of about 4.2 billion kilometers (2.6 billion miles) from the spacecraft, Pluto is little more than a faint point of light among a dense field of stars. Mission scientists knew they had Pluto in their sights when LORRI detected an unresolved " point"in Pluto's predicted position, moving at the planet's expected motion across the constellation of Sagittarius near...
Keywords: What -- Pluto; What -- New Horizons; What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- Constellation; What -- Sagittarius; Where -- Milky Way Galaxy
Downloads: 5
[image]Capturing Callisto - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
The New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) captured these two images of Jupiter's outermost large moon, Callisto, as the spacecraft flew past Jupiter in late February. New Horizons' closest approach distance to Jupiter was 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles), not far outside Callisto's orbit, which has a radius of 1.9 million kilometers (1.2 million miles). However, Callisto happened to be on the opposite side of Jupiter during the spacecraft's pass through the Jupiter syst...
Keywords: What -- New Horizons; What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- Moon; What -- Callisto; What -- Jupiter; What -- Crater; What -- Io; What -- Europa; What -- Ganymede; What -- LEISA; What -- Pluto; What -- Charon; What -- Opportunity
Downloads: 6
[image]A "Plumefall" on Io - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
New Horizons took this image of Jupiter's volcanic moon Io with its Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) at 15:15 Universal Time on February 28, 2007, nearly 10 hours after the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. The image is centered at Io coordinates 5 degrees south, 92 degrees west, and the spacecraft was 2.4 million kilometers (1.5 million miles) from Io. Io's diameter is 3,640 kilometers (2,262 miles)...
Keywords: What -- New Horizons; What -- Moon; What -- Io; What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- Jupiter; What -- Sun
Downloads: 4
[image]Tvashtar in Motion - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
This five-frame sequence of New Horizons images captures the giant plume from Io's Tvashtar volcano. Snapped by the probe's Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) as the spacecraft flew past Jupiter earlier this year, this first-ever "movie" of an Io plume clearly shows motion in the cloud of volcanic debris, which extends 330 kilometers (200 miles) above the moon's surface. Only the upper part of the plume is visible from this vantage point -- the plume's source is 130 kilometers (80 miles) b...
Keywords: What -- New Horizons; What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- Jupiter; What -- Io; What -- Moon; What -- Earth
Downloads: 6
[image]A Burst of Color - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
New Horizons captured this unique view of Jupiter's moon Io with its color camera -- the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) -- at 00:25 UT on March 1, 2007, from a range of 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles). The image is centered at Io coordinates 4 degrees south, 162 degrees west, and was taken shortly before the complementary Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) photo of Io released on March 13 (see PIA09250), which had higher resolution but was not in color...
Keywords: What -- New Horizons; What -- Moon; What -- Io; What -- Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera; What -- MVIC; What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- Jupiter; What -- Pluto
Downloads: 7
[image]Best Color Image of Jupiter's Little Red Spot - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
This amazing color portrait of Jupiter's "Little Red Spot" (LRS) combines high-resolution images from the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), taken at 03:12 UT on February 27, 2007, with color images taken nearly simultaneously by the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The LORRI images provide details as fine as 9 miles across (15 kilometers), which is approximately 10 times better than Hubble can provide on its own...
Keywords: What -- New Horizons; What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- Wide Field Planetary Camera 2; What -- Camera 2; What -- Hubble Space Telescope (HST); What -- Jupiter; What -- Earth; What -- Opportunity
Downloads: 14
[image]Storms and Moons - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
The New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) took this 2-millisecond exposure of Jupiter at 04:41:04 UTC on January 24, 2007. The spacecraft was 57 million kilometers (35.3 million miles) from Jupiter, closing in on the giant planet at 41,500 miles (66,790 kilometers) per hour. At right are the moons Io (bottom) and Ganymede; Ganymede's shadow creeps toward the top of Jupiter's northern hemisphere...
Keywords: What -- New Horizons; What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- Jupiter; What -- Io; What -- Ganymede; What -- Earth
Downloads: 6
[image]A Brilliant Plume - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
The Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on New Horizons captured another dramatic picture of Jupiter's moon Io and its volcanic plumes, 19 hours after the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter on Feb. 28, 2007. LORRI took this 75 millisecond exposure at 0035 Universal Time on March 1, 2007, when Io was 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) from the spacecraft. Io's dayside is deliberately overexposed to bring out faint details in the plumes and on the moon's night side...
Keywords: What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- New Horizons; What -- Moon; What -- Io; What -- Jupiter; What -- Sun; What -- Galileo; Where -- Colorado
Downloads: 5
[image]Io and Ganymede - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
The New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) took this 4-millisecond exposure of Jupiter and two of its moons at 01:41:04 UTC on January 17, 2007. The spacecraft was 68.5 million kilometers (42.5 million miles) from Jupiter, closing in on the giant planet at 41,500 miles (66,790 kilometers) per hour. The volcanic moon Io is the closest planet to the right of Jupiter; the icy moon Ganymede is to Io's right...
Keywords: What -- New Horizons; What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- Jupiter; What -- Moon; What -- Io; What -- Ganymede; What -- Mercury
Downloads: 8
[image]Jupiter's High-Altitude Clouds - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
The New Horizons Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) snapped this incredibly detailed picture of Jupiter's high-altitude clouds starting at 06:00 Universal Time on February 28, 2007, when the spacecraft was only 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) from the solar system's largest planet. Features as small as 50 kilometers (30 miles) are visible. The image was taken through a narrow filter centered on a methane absorption band near 890 nanometers, a considerably redder wavelength th...
Keywords: What -- New Horizons; What -- Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera; What -- MVIC; What -- Polar; What -- Jupiter
Downloads: 6
[image]Europa - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
This image of Jupiter's icy moon Europa, the first Europa image returned by New Horizons, was taken with the spacecraft's Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) camera at 07:19 Universal Time on February 27, from a range of 3.1 million kilometers (1.9 million miles). The longitude of the disk center is 307 degrees West and the image scale is 15 kilometers (9 miles) per pixel. This is one of a series of images designed to look for landforms near Europa's terminator -- the line dividing day and ...
Keywords: What -- Moon; What -- Europa; What -- New Horizons; What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- Sun; What -- Jupiter; What -- Earth
Downloads: 11
[image]Full Jupiter Mosaic - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
This image of Jupiter is produced from a 2x2 mosaic of photos taken by the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), and assembled by the LORRI team at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. The telescopic camera snapped the images during a 3-minute, 35-second span on February 10, when the spacecraft was 29 million kilometers (18 million miles) from Jupiter. At this distance, Jupiter's diameter was 1,015 LORRI pixels -- nearly filling the imager's entire (1,024-by-...
Keywords: What -- Jupiter; What -- New Horizons; What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- Sun; What -- Earth
Downloads: 8
[image]Io Surface Changes - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
This montage compares similar sides of Io photographed by the Galileo spacecraft in October 1999 (left) and the New Horizons spacecraft on February 27, 2007. The New Horizons image was taken with its Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) from a range of 2.7 million kilometers (1.7 million miles). Most features on Io have changed little in the seven-plus years between these images, despite continued intense volcanic activity...
Keywords: What -- Io; What -- Galileo; What -- New Horizons; What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI
Downloads: 5
[image]Two Moons Meet over Jupiter - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
This beautiful image of the crescents of volcanic Io and more sedate Europa was snapped by New Horizons' color Multispectral Visual Imaging Camera (MVIC) at 10:34 UT on March 2, 2007, about two days after New Horizons made its closest approach to Jupiter. The picture was one of a handful of the Jupiter system that New Horizons took primarily for their artistic, rather than scientific value. This particular scene was suggested by space enthusiast Richard Hendricks of Austin, Texas, in response to...
Keywords: What -- Io; What -- Europa; What -- New Horizons; What -- MVIC; What -- Jupiter; Where -- Austin; Where -- Texas
Downloads: 7
[image]Jupiter Atmospheric Map - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
Huge cyclonic storms, the Great Red Spot and the Little Red Spot, and wispy cloud patterns are seen in fascinating detail in this map of Jupiter's atmosphere obtained January 14-15, 2007, by the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI). The map combines information from 11 different LORRI images that were taken every hour over a 10-hour period -- a full Jovian day -- from 17:42 UTC on January 14 to 03:42 UTC on January 15...
Keywords: What -- New Horizons; What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- Jupiter; What -- Earth; What -- Sun; What -- Polar
Downloads: 10
[image]New Horizons Sees Pluto (Sept. 21) - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
A white arrow marks Pluto in this New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) picture taken Sept. 21, 2006. Seen at a distance of about 4.2 billion kilometers (2.6 billion miles) from the spacecraft, Pluto is little more than a faint point of light among a dense field of stars. Mission scientists knew they had Pluto in their sights when LORRI detected an unresolved " point"in Pluto's predicted position, moving at the planet's expected motion across the constellation of Sagittarius near...
Keywords: What -- Pluto; What -- New Horizons; What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- Constellation; What -- Sagittarius; Where -- Milky Way Galaxy
Downloads: 6
[image]Jupiter's Magnetosphere Made Visible - NASA/JPL/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory
The vast magnetosphere of charged particles whirling around Jupiter, normally invisible, can be imaged by a new type of instrument aboard NASA's Cassini spacecraft and is seen here. Three features are sketched in for context: a black circle showing the size of Jupiter, lines of Jupiter's magnetic field, and a cross-section of the Io torus, a doughnut-shaped ring of charged particles that originate from volcanic eruptions on Jupiter's moon Io and circle Jupiter at about the orbit of Io...
Keywords: What -- Jupiter; What -- Cassini; What -- Io; What -- Moon; What -- Sun; What -- Earth; What -- Ion and Neutral Camera (INCA); What -- Saturn; Where -- Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL); Where -- California; Where -- Washington
Downloads: 25
[image]New Horizons at Pluto - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
Artist's concept of the New Horizons spacecraft as it approaches Pluto and its largest moon, Charon, in July 2015. The craft's miniature cameras, radio science experiment, ultraviolet and infrared spectrometers and space plasma experiments will characterize the global geology and geomorphology of Pluto and Charon, map their surface compositions and temperatures, and examine Pluto's atmosphere in detail...
Keywords: What -- New Horizons; What -- Pluto; What -- Moon; What -- Charon; What -- Infrared Spectrometer; What -- Earth
Downloads: 6
[image]Europa Rising - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
New Horizons took this image of the icy moon Europa rising above Jupiter's cloud tops with its Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) at 11:48 Universal Time on February 28, 2007, six hours after the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. The picture was one of a handful of the Jupiter system that New Horizons took primarily for artistic, rather than scientific, value. This particular scene was suggested by space enthusiast Richard Hendricks of Austin, Texas, in response to an Internet requ...
Keywords: What -- New Horizons; What -- Moon; What -- Europa; What -- Long Range Reconnaissance Imager; What -- Imager; What -- LORRI; What -- Jupiter; Where -- Austin; Where -- Texas
Downloads: 6
[image]Jupiter Torus Diagram - NASA/JPL/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory
A cut-away schematic of Jupiter's space environment shows magnetically trapped radiation ions (in red), the neutral gas torus of the volcanic moon Io (green) and the newly discovered neutral gas torus of the moon Europa (blue). The white lines represent magnetic field lines. Energetic neutral atoms (ENA) are emitted from the Europa torus regions because of the interaction between the trapped ions and the neutral gases...
Keywords: What -- Moon; What -- Io; What -- Europa; What -- Magnetospheric IMaging Instrument (MIMI); What -- Cassini; What -- Jupiter; Where -- Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL); Where -- California; Where -- Washington
Downloads: 26
[image]Birth of an Earth-like Planet - NASA/JPL-Caltech/ C. Lisse (Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory)
This artist's conception shows a binary-star, or two-star, system, called HD 113766, where astronomers suspect a rocky Earth-like planet is forming around one of the stars. At approximately 10 to 16 million years old, astronomers suspect this star is at just the right age for forming rocky planets. The system is located approximately 424 light-years away from Earth. The two yellow spots in the image represent the system's two stars...
Keywords: What -- Earth; What -- Mars; What -- Spitzer Space Telescope; What -- COMETS
Downloads: 11
[image]Rachmaninoff on Mercury - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington
The International Astronomical Union (IAU) recently approved the name Rachmaninoff for an intriguing double-ring basin on Mercury. This basin, first imaged in its entirety during MESSENGER's third Mercury flyby, was quickly identified as a feature of high scientific interest, because of its fresh appearance, its distinctively colored interior plains, and the extensional troughs on its floor. The basin's name honors the Russian composer, pianist and conductor, Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943)...
Keywords: What -- Mercury; What -- Crater; Where -- Washington
Downloads: 18
[texts]Fire technology abstracts (Volume Vol. 4, No. 6 (Feb.)) - Johns Hopkins University. Applied Physics Laboratory
Vols. for July/Oct. 1976- prepared by the Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University
Downloads: 255
[image]Global Map of Mercury - NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington/U. S. Geological Survey/Arizona State University
In December 2009, the first high-resolution global map of Mercury was made publicly available. These images are from MESSENGER, a NASA Discovery mission to conduct the first orbital study of the innermost planet, Mercury. Members of the MESSENGER team and experts from the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) used images from MESSENGER's three Mercury flybys and from the Mariner 10 mission in 1974-75 to create a global mosaic that covers 97.7% of Mercury's surface at a resolution of 500 meters/pixel (0...
Keywords: What -- Mercury; What -- MESSENGER; What -- Mariner 10
Downloads: 85
[texts]Fire technology abstracts / prepared by Applied Physics Laboratory, The Johns Hopkins University - Johns Hopkins University. Applied Physics Laboratory
Vols. for July-Oct. 1976-Jan.-Feb. 1979 were issued by the Dept. of Commerce, National Fire Prevention and Control Administration, Fire Reference Service (July-Oct. 1976 issued under the earlier name of the Service, National Fire Reference Service); Mar.-Apr. 1979- by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, U.S. Fire Administration, Data Dissemination and Use Division, - Informatics General Corporation
Keywords: Fire prevention Abstracts Periodicals
Downloads: 438
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